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Book review: Three books to read when you don’t want to read

Keyur Basnet

Keyur Basnet

Book review: Three books to read when you don’t want to read

These are books that can rescue you. Sit back with a cup of tea and one of them and you’ll find yourself recharged in no time

Reading slumps are real. There are times when you have read a really good book and are so caught in that timeline and place, you can’t immerse yourself in another story. Or you have had a bout of bad luck and have been picking up one terrible book after another only to shove them back on the shelf halfway through. No matter how hard you try, you just can’t seem to get back in the game. There are some books that can rescue you at times like these. Sit back with a cup of tea and one of them and you’ll find yourself recharged in no time. 

Atlas of the Heart by Brené Brown

‘Atlas of the Heart’ uses science-backed facts and research to teach us how to embrace our emotions and use meaningful language to build deeper connections with others. Brown explores over 87 human emotions and offers us tools to express and understand them. It’s a book for those who want to understand and be in more control of their emotions. Brown keeps reminding you, with impactful examples, that you must be your authentic self and embrace your vulnerabilities to truly master your emotions. The book is big and heavy with thick glossy pages but the good thing is the design is interactive with photos, graphics, and entire pages of contemplative quotes and questions. 

The Boy, the Mole, the Fox, and the Horse by Charlie Mackesy

The book, in Mackesy’s words, is a “small graphic novel of images and conversations over a landscape.” The story is really simple and saying anything at all would be giving too much away. ‘The Boy, the Mole, the Fox and the Horse’ is essentially a tale of friendship and courage that is comforting to read. It gives you a lot to mull over. The artwork is super fun to look at and you might be inspired to try and replicate it. You can also use the book as a journal of sorts as it has a lot of space for you to jot down your thoughts or stick some post-it notes (if, like me, you too hate the idea of scribbling on books). 

The Comfort Book by Matt Haig

Matt Haig is an empathetic writer. His stories strike a chord and make you feel seen and heard. ‘The Midnight Library’, a fictional story about the choices that shape our lives, was such a heartwarming read. It was the best book I had read in 2020 and since then I have gone back to reread many of its passages. ‘The Comfort Book’, on the other hand, is non-fiction. It’s basically Haig’s reflections on the ups and downs of life and there’s a lot of wisdom there. There are positive affirmations, quotes, thoughts on food and books and anecdotes of inspirational people—it’s all very heartwarming. Also, the chapters or sections are short and you don’t have to read the book from start to finish. Just dip in and out and be charmed.